DUAL FORCE MOTOR

Abstract

    A direct current electric motor having particular utility as a means of substantially reducing the size and weight of such dynamos by increasing the mechanical output power and torque of the rotor shaft.

    The Dual-Force Motor configuration includes a gear set which directly couples counter rotating motions in a one to one (1:1) ratio.

    By directly coupling together the rotor assembly Figure 2, to the case-rotor assembly Figure 3, the energy input of the operating power electromagnetic field that would normally be wasted in a stationary motor case is allowed to add such stored inertial energy input to the output of the motor.

    The Dual-Force Motor configuration includes a bevel gear set which directly couples counter rotating motions of the rotor assembly and the case-rotor assembly in a one to one (1:1) ratio. The rotor assembly and the case-rotor assembly must rotate at the same speed.

    Such provision for coupling the stored energy of both the rotor assembly the case-rotor assembly creates a substantial increase in output mechanical power of a standard rated direct current electric motor.

Background

    Field of the Invention

    The present invention relates to a Direct Current Electric Motor adapted to a mechanical configuration which provides a previously unused store of mechanical inertial energy. The Dual Force Motor configuration effectively utilizes the counter-rotational motion and energy stored in the normally stationary field/stator case rotor (case-rotor assembly) of an electric motor to significantly amplify mechanical power output and torque. More particularly, the present invention relates to an improved D.C. electric motor by a specially designed mechanical configuration of the rotor assembly with respect to the case-rotor assembly.

     Description of the Related Art

    Electric motors, both alternating current (AC), and Direct Current (DC), are used in virtually all applications requiring motive power not employing internal combustion engines. Electric motors typically consist of a single rotor assembly and a single case assembly. The motor rotor being that assembly element which is allowed to rotate for the purpose of providing a rotational power output and degree of torque for operating mechanical machines based upon the principle of spin physics. Invariably, and virtually without exception, electric motors are mechanically configured so that only the benefits of the induced electric power input, converted to mechanical rotating power output and torque, relative to the motor rotor, are utilized. The potential power output and torque inherent in the electric motor case is usually wasted by being bolted to some type of stationary frame and prohibited from spinning or rotating.

    Most generally, electric motors are mechanically configured with two basic assemblies; a rotor assembly, consisting of a central rotor shaft upon which a laminated rotor assembly is mounted, and a stator assembly which is mounted to the electric motor case which is stationary with respect to the rotor and therefore, also identified as the motor stator.

    Typically, with respect to a DC electric motor, the laminated rotor assembly hosts copper wire conductor windings which are mechanically and electrically connected to a segmented commutator which allows electrical power input to specific rotor assembly copper wire windings through commutator brushes, to create electro-magnets and thus electromagnetic fields in the rotor assembly. The field or stator assembly is composed of either permanent magnets or electro-magnets. For the purposes of this discussion, permanent magnets in the field assembly will be assumed. The proximity of the magnetic fields of the rotor and field cause mechanical rotation of the electric motor rotor.

    It is a well known fact that a law of physics relates that “for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.” This principle of Earthly physics is the basis of the laws governing the performance of the Dual Force Motor. By suspending the case-rotor on ball bearings in order to allow the case-rotor to rotate, the inducement of electric power to the rotor copper conductor windings will cause counter-rotation of the rotor and case-rotor assemblies.

    By allowing the case-rotor assembly to freely counter-rotate around the rotor assembly axis and by mechanically coupling the counter-rotational masses of the two assemblies, the combined mechanical energy, created by the applied electric power, increases the efficiency of the conversion of the electric power input to mechanical rotational force or torque.

    Although electric motor rotor assemblies and case-stator assemblies have been mechanically coupled in the past, such configurations have not focused on the equal counter-rotational spin rate and equal weight of the electric motor assemblies for the purpose of increasing the efficiency of electric motor power input with respect to mechanical rotational force output. The configuration embodied in the Burtis Patent, U.S. Patent 4,056,745, Nov. 1, 1977, uses planetary gearing which prohibits equal spin rate of the rotor assembly and the case-rotor assembly, thereby attenuating the potential mechanical force output of the counter-rotating electric motor assemblies. The Holka Patent, U.S. Patent 5,262,693, Nov. 16, 1993, utilizes the same concept as Burtis for a mechanically driven alternator generator. A Planetary gear set guarantees a counter-rotational rate of spin offset which prohibits full potential output of the counter-rotational-fields alternator.

    It is therefore an object of the present invention to overcome the deficiencies of the known embodiments for coupling the counter-rotational spin of the rotor assembly and case-rotor assembly of an electric motor.

Summary

    Briefly stated, in accordance with one aspect of the present invention, apparatus is provided for coupling the electric power induced inertial energy rotational forces of the equally weighted masses of the counter-rotating rotor assembly and case-rotor assembly of a direct current permanent magnet electric motor. The dual-force motor configuration can be applied to virtually any electric motor and provide a single mechanical rotational power output (single output shaft) either/or double mechanical rotational power output (double ended mechanical power output shafts).

    Additionally, the dual force motor can be configured as an infinitely variable-speed electro-magnetic transmission, Figure 5, by providing a means to disconnect the bevel gear set coupling, Figure 5, item 36, to allow independent counter-rotation of the rotor and case-rotor assemblies. Output speed variance is obtained by mechanically controlling the rotational speed of one of the counter-rotating electric motor assemblies. Figure 5, items 33, 34, 35. Mechanically retarding the rotational speed of one of the counter-rotating electric motor assemblies will cause a corresponding increase of the counter-rotational speed of the other electric motor assembly. By electronic and mechanical controls, an infinitely variable electro-magnetic transmission is created without the problem of mechanical mesh gears. The “gearing” of such a transmission is embodied in the counter-rotating electro-magnetic fields of the electric motors rotor assembly and case-rotor assembly.

 Brief Description of the Drawings

    Figure 1 is a composite side view of the complete Dual Force Motor configuration.

    Figure 2 is a fragmentary side view of the Dual Force Motor composite drawing showing the electric motor rotor assembly.

    Figure 3 is a fragmentary side view of the Dual Force Motor

composite drawing showing the electric motor case-rotor

assembly.

    Figure 4 is a fragmentary side view of the Dual Force Motor composite drawing showing the electric motor stationary case for the counter-rotational electric motor assemblies.

    Figure 5 is a composite side view of the complete Dual Force Motor Transmission configuration.

 Description of the Preferred Embodiments

    Referring to the drawings, and particularly to Figure 1 through 4 thereof, there is shown a stationary case assembly, Figure 4, items 13, 14, 18, 20, 21, 23, having an elongated cylinder shape to which are mounted the pinion gear adjust housings 32 within which are mounted the pinion gear bearing housing 31. Stationary case assembly support bearings 16, 17, 19, 22, 24, are incorporated to provide ball bearing rotational support for the counter-rotating rotor assembly, Figure 2, items 1, 2, 3, 4, 25, 27 and case-rotor assembly. Figure 3, items 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 26.

     Case-Rotor Assembly

    The dual force motor configuration case-rotor assembly end caps Figure 3, items 7, and 9, incorporate hollow shaft extensions to facilitate ball bearings Figure 4, items 16 and 19 suspension. The end cap extension of Figure 3, item 7 also facilitates mounting of case-rotor bevel gear Figure 3, item 26. End cap Figure 3, item 9 also incorporates two concentric slip-rings Figure 3, item 11 for transmission of applied electrical power input through brush/brush-holder assemblies Figure 3, item 10 to the rotor commutator assembly Figure 2, item 2. Figure 3, item 6 depicts relative 4 pole position of case-rotor permanent magnets.

     Rotor Assembly

    The dual force motor configuration rotor assembly Figure 2 demonstrates the components which rotate with the laminated rotor Figure 2, item 1. The commutator Figure 2, item 2 incorporates wedge shaped segments which are connected to the coil windings of the laminated rotor according to standard electric motor rotor winding requirements. The wedge shaped commutator segments arrayed in a 90 degree offset to standard commutator segment orientation provides a method of commutation wherein the brushes Figure 3, item 10 will not separate from the commutator due to centrifugal forces which are imposed thereon by the counter-rotation of the case-rotor assembly. The rotor shaft Figure 2, item 3 upon which the laminated rotor and commutator are mounted, also connects to a hollow shaft coupling Figure 2, item 27 with a key and key-way arrangement that secures the coupling to the rotor shaft. Attached to the rotor coupling in like manner with a key and key-way arrangement are the equalizer weight Figure 2, item 4 and the rotor bevel gear Figure 2, item 25. The equalizer weight Figure 2, item 4 is machined to a weight that compensates for any difference between the case-rotor assembly and the rotor assembly. Equal mass of the two counter-rotating assemblies insures that an equal mechanical counter-rotating torque will be coupled with the bevel gear set Figure 1 items 25 and 26 bevel gears and items 28 and 29 pinion gears into the single output of the rotor assembly shaft Figure 1 item 3.

    Stationary Case

    The dual force motor stationary case is comprised of 6 basic elements, (1) Figure 4 item 13 motor outer case, (2) item 14 stationary case end cap, (3) item 18 stationary case bulkhead, (4) item 20 bevel gear set case, (5) item 21 bevel gear case end cap, (6) item 23 rotor output shaft bearing cap. The pinion gears items 28 which actually couple the counter-rotating rotor and case-rotor assemblies are supported by pinion gear shafts items 29, pinion gear bearings items 30, pinion gear bearing housings items 31, and pinion gear adjuster housings items 32, which are secured to bevel gear set case item 20. The pinion gear adjustability is provided to properly engage the gear teeth of the bevel gear set.

    It is well known to those skilled in the art, that a bevel gear set arrangement, such as that depicted in Figure 1, is the most convenient method to couple counter-rotating shafts of equal spin rate or speed. The dual force motor configuration may be scaled in size to provide motive power to virtually any application as long as the basic bevel gear set configuration, as depicted, is maintained in associate scale with the power and speed output of the electric motor counter-rotating rotor and case rotor assemblies. Electronic speed control systems for controlling the output shaft speed of the dual force motor may be applied without modification or deviation from standard direct current electric motor speed control practices.

    From the foregoing, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the dual force motor configuration herein described results in an overall performance efficiency increase for direct current electric motors. Alternating current motors may also be configured in the dual force motor configuration to effect comparable gains in output efficiency.

    Although particular embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated and described, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications can be made without departing from the spirit of the present invention. Accordingly, it is intended to encompass within the appended claims all such changes and modifications that fall within the scope of the present invention.

Claims:

1.  Counter Rotational Energy Conversion of

         a.  the electrical power induced inertial energy of the case-rotor assembly of a direct current electric motor,

         b.  coupled, and thereby added to,

         c.  the electrical power induced inertial energy of the rotor assembly of same electric motor; and

2.  That the Dual-Force Motor directly couples the counter-rotating electrical power induced inertial forces created by a Direct Current electric motor when the motor case assembly is mechanically configured with a ball bearing suspension allowing counter-rotation with respect to the electric motor’s rotor rotation; and,

3.  That the Dual-Force Motor couples the electrical power induced inertial-force energy stored in both the rotor assembly and the rotating case-rotor assembly into a single rotating shaft; and,

4.  That the Dual-Force Motor couples the counter-rotating electrical power induced inertial forces of the case-rotor assembly and the rotor assembly together with a bevel gear set; and

5.  That the Dual-Force Motor bevel gear set maintains a 1:1 ratio between the rotational speeds of the counter-rotating case-rotor assembly and the rotor assembly; and

6.  That the Dual-Force Motor counter-rotating case-rotor assembly and the rotor assembly are configured to be of equal weights; and

7.  That the Dual-Force Motor substantially increases the efficiency and mechanical force and torque output of a direct current electric motor; and,

8.  That the Dual-Force Motor increases the ratio between the input power required to operate a direct current electric motor and the mechanical force and torque output of a direct current electric motor; and,

9.  That the Dual-Force Motor greatly reduces the required size and weight of a direct current electric motor, with respect to the standard requirements of weight and size of standard electric motors to produce a given output; and,

10. That the Dual-Force Motor configuration greatly enhances the efficiency of direct current and alternating current electric motors.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

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